Posts tagged "advance directives"

Incapacity planning ties into estate planning

Planning for incapacity is something we all should do at some point.  Doing so ensures that when you are no longer able to make decisions for yourself, there are structures and instructions in place so that legal, financial, and personal matters are handled dealt with properly.  

Incapacity planning ties into estate planning

Planning for incapacity is something we all should do at some point.  Doing so ensures that when you are no longer able to make decisions for yourself, there are structures and instructions in place so that legal, financial, and personal matters are handled dealt with properly.  

Health care directives not always honored

Advance directives, for those who’ve done research on the topic, are instruments that provide tools for folks to handle their medical care in the event they lose the ability to make such decisions. In Georgia, state law provides the opportunity for people to select a health care agent to make decisions on their behalf, as well as to express their wishes regarding specific treatments or courses of care.

Psychiatric advance directives provide focus on mental health care, P.2

In a previous post, we began speaking about psychiatric advance directives, which are documents outlining the preferences of mental health patients in terms of medical care. These documents, now in use in various states, give those with mental health conditions the opportunity to better control how they are cared for in times of crisis, when they are no longer competent to make decisions.

Psychiatric advance directives provide focus on mental health care, P.1

Our Georgia readers may have heard of advance health care directives and of their importance in helping to avoid confusion and disagreement over medical decision-making. Think of Terri Schiavo and similar incidents. Among those who know about advance directives, there is a tendency to think of these important documents as useful tools for competent adults who want to identify their wishes for end-of-life care in the event they undergo an acute injury or degenerative illness that ultimately leaves them incapacitated. And, indeed, this is a fairly accurate concept of what advance directives can do.

Spiritual support from friends leads to more aggressive end-of-life care

According to a new study conducted by the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, those with advanced cancer are more likely to receive aggressive care at the end of life and spend more time in intensive care of the receive some sort of spiritual support from a religious community. The outcome was actually the opposite of what the researchers had expected, as previous evidence has shown that spiritual support from a patient’s medical team leads to less aggressive care and more use of hospice care.

UW Wisconsin study says surgeons are wary of advance directives

A recent study by a University of Wisconsin Madison surgical professor suggests that advance directives, or "living wills," may impede the work of surgeons, even causing some to refuse treatment of those with advance directives preventing the use of extraordinary measures.

Advance directives: an important part of estate planning, P.2

In our previous post, we began discussing the importance of including an advance directive in the estate planning process. Doing so is lets health care providers and family know of one's medical wishes in the event that one is incapacitated and unable to communicate those wishes.

Advance directives: an important part of estate planning, P.1

Many families, at some point, face difficult decisions regarding end-of-life for a loved one. Sometimes it isn't clear what call to make in the moment, or what the loved one would prefer if they could speak for themselves.

Granting a Georgia power of attorney

Medical advancements have allowed many Georgia residents to live longer, but this means that more Georgians may face a diminished mental state in their later years. Residents who might be impacted by dementia and Alzheimer's disease should choose an agent by granting a power of attorney.

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