Minor in Possession/Underage Drinking Archives

Intoxication of a minor a serious concern for business owners

Georgia parents and their teens are gearing up for a new school year. Whether they will be attending a local high school or going off to college, parents may worry that their teens will have trouble adjusting to their unfamiliar social environment. The desire to fit in can lead teens to make bad decisions. While most teens probably do not understand the consequences that can come from drinking before they reach legal age, local business owners and law enforcement do, and are on a mission to prevent incidents of intoxication of a minor. 

Underage DUI lands friend in intensive care

Georgia parents are all too aware of how stressful it is raising teenagers. As young adults, teens are learning to become responsible members of society, but there are many bumps along the road. Teens sometimes do not understand that their actions can have serious consequences, or that one poor choice can potentially affect the rest of their life, and the lives of others. One possible concern for parents with teen drivers is the risks associated with an underage DUI

Underage DUI accident kills 1, leads to homicide charges

Most Georgia parents would likely agree that when their children reach an age where they are old enough to be allowed to get behind the wheel and venture out on their own with friends, parents hope that they will be safe and responsible. It is always frightening for parents when the phone rings, informing them that their teen has been involved in an accident, and things can go from bad to worse when the accident turns out to be an underage DUI that has resulted in fatality. Parents are immediately faced with a grim reality, especially if their child is the one who stands accused of committing a crime that has resulted in the injury or death of another person. 

Minor receives citation for alcohol consumption

Following high school, students can decide to further their education by entering college. In Georgia, college can provide students with liberties and freedoms associated with living independently that they were not previously exposed to. Young adults could be tempted with the commonality and presence of alcohol, especially when friends and fellow students are partaking in alcohol consumption. Until the students are 21 years old, drinking alcohol is illegal, and a citation for underage drinking can be issued by law enforcement.

Would you pass the test when it comes to open container laws?

Socializing is a large part of the college experience here in Georgia and around the country. As such, many of the gatherings for college students tend to include alcohol. Violating the state's open container laws could jeopardize your college career and your future.

Alcohol and your teenager's future just don't mix

Teenagers here in Atlanta and across the country will attend parties with their friends this summer. Unless you host the party yourself, you have no guarantee that alcohol will not be available at the parties that your teen attends. If a teenager ends up somehow crossing paths with law enforcement and is accused of an alcohol-related crime, it could jeopardize his or her future.

Alcohol use can cause major problems for college students

Like other college students here in Georgia, you may be away from home for the first time. You want to make the most of your college experience, and that often means attending parties. Perhaps you attended a party where you drank too much alcohol and ended up under arrest.

Impairment and open container laws in Georgia

Many traffic stops often include more than just a suspicion of being impaired. An officer may cite a driver for speeding, weaving or even reckless driving, depending on the circumstances. Any of these driving behaviors could provide further evidence of an impaired driver. Furthermore, if a driver is also accused of violating the state's open container laws, the situation could become more complicated.

A look at underage DUI in Georgia

Congress passed the National Minimum Legal Drinking Act back in 1984. The law established the legal drinking age at 21, and if states, including Georgia, wanted to continue to receive federal monies for road construction projects, they had to set their legal minimum age to drink at 21. Along with the implementation of the lawful drinking age, Georgia and other states enacted laws to deal with underage DUI.

Mr. Teiger, Thank you very much for your time and results. I will definitely recommend you & your firm to anyone who wants to be treated professionally courteously and needs results.Hope all is well.Again...thank you. Regards, Paul L.

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